About Ella Raidel

About Ella Raidel

Ella Raidel, Ph.D., is a filmmaker, artist and researcher. Since April 2019 she is Assistant Professor at NTU Singapore at ADM School of Art, Design and Media and WKWSCI School of Communication and Information.

In her interdisciplinary work – films, videos, writings – she focuses on the socio-cultural impact of globalization with a focus on urbanization and Asian cinemas. She is interested in reflexive forms of narration in questioning the representation in documentary films. Her film-making corresponds with her writings on Sinophone cinema for researching the poetics in image-making. Her work has been presented and distinguished in numerous international film festivals, exhibitions and biennials. She is the co-editor (with Peng Hsiao-yen) of Altering Archives, The Politics of Memory in Sinophone Cinemas and Image Culture (Routledge Contemporary China Series 2018) and has publicized on Tsai Ming-Liang’s work.

Artistic Research in Film Conference 2021

Artistic Research in Film Conference 2021

International GEECT Conference// Transversal Entanglement // Artistic Research in Film

3-5 June 2021

The freedom of searching the unsearchable in the process of filmmaking as artistic research allows combining different disciplines, such as philosophy, cultural studies, urban studies and film studies to enhance each other’s range of knowledge production. In her ongoing art-based research project, Ella Raidel investigates China’s urban spaces in and through cinema.

The subject investigated is how global capitalism is affecting and haunting the living conditions of our time. In exploring the line between documentary and fiction, Ella Raidel develops a method of performative documentary to create a discursive space in which facts, analyses, commentaries, and references can be woven into one narrative. This research is not only to scrutinize the social reality and to render the social discourse but also to reflect on the convention of filmmaking and its representations. Her new film A PILE OF GHOSTS on Chinese Ghost cities will be released in 2021 and will be the subject of this talk.

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Altering Archives

Altering Archives

The Politics of Memory in Sinophone Cinemas and Image Culture-Altering Archives
Edited by Peng Hsiao-yen and Ella Raidel

Routledge Contemporary China Series

The Politics of Memory in Sinophone Cinemas and Image Culture investigates Sinophone films and art projects that express this desire for archiving and reconfiguring the past. Comprising ten chapters, this book brings together contributors from an array of disciplines – artists, filmmakers, curators, film critics, and literary scholars – to grapple with the creative ambiguities of Sinophone cinemas and image culture. Blending eclectic methods of scholarly research, knowledge-making, and art-making into a new discursive space, the chapters address the diverse complexities of the cinematic culture and image production in Sinitic language regions.

With contributions by: Yu-lin Lee, Chen Chieh-jen, Hongjohn Lin, Peng Hsiao-yen, Ella Raidel, Sandy Hsiu-chih Lo, Chris Berry, Lu Xinyu, Agnes S. Schick-Chen, Isabel Wolte

Ruinscapes – Special Issue

Ruinscapes – Special Issue

Publication:

Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, Volume 11, Issue 2
Edited by Tse-Lan Deborah Sang and Chun Zhang

Ella Raidel, “The Exhausted Narrative in Tsai Ming-Liang’s Films”, pages 329-351

This articel sets out to examine the “exhausted narrative” in aesthetic and poetic experience, revealing the affect and effect of Tsai Ming-Liang’s film-making. He is notable for his obsession with ruins, defunct construction sites, abandoned buildings, and film itself as a modern ruin. These sites are a reminder of the alienated subjects within its historical context, a fragmented narrative, and an uncertain or failed future to come, just like the ruin-a chapter of a halted story. Tsai’s films are not only full of ruinous images and bodies, but even the fragmented narratives are ruinous, turning in elliptical circles, aiming toward their morbid ending until their total exhaustion. This cinematic ouroboros ophis will be discussed in two aspects: first, as an aesthetic practice, and second, as the parallelism between the onand off-screen reality of the mode of production and reception in the cinematic experience. The term “exhausted narratives” refers to the processes of writing meta-fiction, as that of “re-orchestrating” and “re-editing” the past with respect to the present, and to inscribing Tsai’s own narrative universe.

http://journal.hep.com.cn/flsc/EN/volumn/volumn_3084.shtml#1

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/16737423/11/2